Books

We Could All Use A Laugh Right Now!

By Gini Rainey

One Hairy Knee – Amy Arndt

The feeling I kept getting while reading Ms. Arndt’s book was “this could have been written by a modern-day Erma Bombeck if she had been dropped smooth into East Texas or Austin as a Generation X’er or perhaps as Millenial.” I’m not ashamed to say I seriously laughed out loud while reading Amy’s first book that is based on her crazy and zany, yet at times poignant and heart-felt, life.  I also am not ashamed to say that as unique as her saga is, there was a whole lot to which I could relate.  What I’m saying here is that I think anyone of us would be able to relate to some of the madcap situations in which Amy found herself – while trying to become the best Amy ever.

Ms. Arndt, while at times a bit self-deprecating, strikes a wonderful balance between that and the strengths she developed to face some of life’s most challenging moments.  From her parents’ divorce when she was young, to truly loving and appreciating her new step-parents, from becoming a step-parent herself to over-coming postpartum depression, from dealing with head lice to knowing what a good marriage she has, Amy doesn’t pull any punches.

If raw feelings, sometimes blunt descriptions, and challenges to theological beliefs offend you, this book is not for you. If reading about someone who tackles life head on without a helmet and stands back with her hands on her hips and laughs boldly at life while encouraging you to laugh along, well, let me ask you – what are you waiting for?  This book is pretty much for you and who couldn’t use a few well-placed laughs right now!

5 of 5

Copyright 2020 – Pigeon Girl Press

 

On the Healing Road: Through the Eyes of An Adoptee – The Poet Dena

And now for something completely different. Written as therapeutic poetry, the Poet Dena tells of her struggle to unite the splintered children of her past that live within her. Given up as a baby, she was placed in a foster under the care of her second mother, until she was adopted by her third mother.  With all the anger and pain suppressed pain from feelings of abandonment, Dena managed to struggle through her life until finally, because of years of therapy and self-discovery, she was finally able to merge all of her inner children into an accepting and peaceful adult.

This book, though not terribly long, nor wordy, is not an easy read. In fact, at times it is quite painful.  Dena’s hope is by writing and sharing how she was able to accept and move on she might be able to help other adoptees to explore their own adoptions and resolve any inner struggles they be experiencing.

4 of 5

Copyright 2018 – authorHOUSE

 

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